Category Archive Tips

ByRick Deutsch

What does an Enrichment Speaker do on a Cruise Ship?

First, an update on what’s going on in Venice. To try and reduce the number of people entering “downtown” Venice, the Mayor put up turnstiles. The locals tore them down – they do not want to be sectored in. The tourist crush is out of control READ more.

Venice entry

Turnstiles – what’s next, badges or arm tattoos?

The purpose of enrichment speakers is to enhance the cruise experience for the passengers, whether it’s highlighting a specific region or providing informative material of a more specific topic like forensics or oceanography.

As an enrichment speaker you will provide a series of talks related to your area of expertise. Each talk should be approximately 45 minutes duration, including 5-10 minutes Q&A post-talk. You should expect to speak on every sea day and possibly on long port days or overnights.

Storytelling on Cruise Ships

Storytelling on Cruise Ships

In exchange for your ‘work’ on board you will be provided  double-occupancy cruise ship accommodations (one stateroom to share with one person) and other various amenities and discounts not available to regular passengers. To facilitate this experience for you, agencies charge an administrative fee that varies by cruise brand, but ranges from $50-$100 per night. This fee includes your on board stateroom, port charges, all meals on board in the main dining room and you can bring a guest to travel with you for no additional charge.

Talks must be PowerPoint driven and  FUN.  Nothing soft – but interesting. YOU are the expert and need to deliver the goods. We can show you how. Read through the website and give us a shout.

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ByRick Deutsch

Two lessons I learned while on a recent cruise as a speaker.

1: Bring a small flashlight up to the podium. We talked about this in a blog eons ago. Reread my discussion of the Emergency (aka Pearl Harbor) Kit.  As I was setting up my laptop and other stuff, it was really dark up there except for a bright light on me. I could not see inside the shelves where the ship had its power strip. I fumbled around until the tech came in and plugged me in.

Then I could not even see the keys on the laptop.  My screen put a shadow on the keyboard so I could not see my function keys.  I guessed where the PowerPoint SLIDE SHOW pull-down was. I had to move way back to get some light on it. I could not see the slots to put in my slide clicker and power.

I brought my tiny LED light from then on.

2: I did not adhere to the cruise speaker’s RULE #1….get off the stage in 45 minutes.  Ooops.   I had a crowd of about 200 people and was lecturing on Aviation.  A super talk….well, since the CD told me I could go an hour…I did.  I even keep a small analog clock up there. However, the Activity Manager later reamed me out.  It was a bit unfair IMHO since the next speaker had 25-minutes to set up – whereas the guy before me gave me seven minutes.  Sigh.

alarm clock

Put an analog clock on the podium

So, do what I say – not as I do!  Here’s  my post on using a clock. I gave five more talks and got off after 45.

A tip that I  preach is to monitor your clock…with 10 mins to go…recognize if you might go over….then slowly wrap it up – even if you have many slides yet to go. The audience will not know. Plan not to have key points at the end.

So the old dog learned.  Contact us and join the fun. We are seeing dozens of our graduates land gigs  on a variety of ships.  You can too.

 

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ByRick Deutsch

Cruise ship tenders – necessary and safe, but pay attention

Many ships have very large drafts (depth below the ship).  The buoyancy of the volume of the part of the ship that’s underwater, actually allows the water to push up and keep the ship from sinking.   But massive ships with 30+ foot drafts can be a problem for shallow landings.

Also, some ports just do not have the facilities to host cruise ships at the dock.  The ships must anchor away and bring passengers ashore via small boats called tenders. In reality they are the ship’s lifeboats. Those sturdy craft can handle high seas and are virtually unsinkable.

tender boat

Riding a cruise ship tender

Since you’ll need to ride one to get to the dock, here are some tips on the use of tenders.

Often there can be a small gap between the gangway and the tender. This might cause a careless person to fall. Do NOT attempt to enter until directed and assisted by a crew member. They have life preservers on for a reason!

If you are taking a backpack…put it on – both straps. Keep your hands free to grab something if you lose your balance. Let the crew assist – take their hand. I prefer to grip their mid-arm. If you are carrying a bag, hand it over to a crew member who will place it on the boat. Keep both hands free. There is no need to push to get on. The tenders can hold well over a hundred. The trip can take only 10-15 minutes; what’s the rush?

When you get on…sit where they tell you. They use a FILO program. First in-last off. Don’t bumble around to find the “best seat.” If crew members, (such as wait-staff or housekeepers) are going to get some time off, they will be riding with you and are directed to be the last ones off. They give the paying customers deference.

Bonus: Read what cruise line topics work

Don’t stand up to get photos. Don’t move around. Sorry, but that is risky and prohibited. Sorry again, but the windows are usually filthy with sea spray. A good shot is of your ship as the tender gets closer. If you are near an open door, take it. Or ask one of the staff to take it using your camera.

I usually bring my laptop on ashore. I’m always working and can usually find a bargain on wifi. Most bars and common restaurants have free wifi. Just buy a soda or have lunch. A good idea is to ask the crew where to find wifi. They may stop at the same ports several times per month and know where to go.  A few Cruise Terminal buildings have wifi for free. Many cruise terminals are offering free connections. I am starting to see “Internet Café’s” disappear.  Those would charge $3.00 for an hour. But I guess the free wifi at eateries has made them unattractive.

Here’s a rather slimy thing to do. Often two or more cruises ships are in port. They usually have pop-up tents for guests to wait unit the next tender comes in.  If you are on Ship A and Ship B has an area right next to yours…check if they have drinks or cookies. They won’t know the better. Yummy.

Finally, did you know that when Elvis was alive, he used to cruise a lot…and he got to really got to like the tender rides. In fact he wrote a song about one:  “Love me Tender!”

Got comments? Check back Mondays for more cruises tips. Send us a comment and learn more about our programs. A free cruise for two? Just by speaking?  You’re kidding?  Nope.

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